Monday Ramblings

I must say I love, love, love the Bloomingdale Farmer’s Market. I ran into my ex-roommate who, though lives 2 blocks from me now, I lost contact with. Reunions, yay! Also Painted Hand had bunny rabbit. Add a sticky-bun and a apple danish, good times.

Since I’m in the general area, congrats to the Big Bear for being in a commercial for a cable company and NBC Universal (YouTube). Yes, BBC you are a beautiful indy coffee shop and would make a lovely filming location.

This weekend a family began moving off the block, and I was told it was the schools that did it. We’ll miss this family as the mom threw some pretty great neighborhood parties. There was the one they held in the middle of the snowstorm, and one where the back gate was opened and the party got extended down the alley with small children running up and down. Add to this with another family with small and very socialable kids who are also planning on moving this year, our little section of the neighborhood is going to lose some of its character. The good kind of character and I hope whomever takes their place will add to the awesomeness of the block, or at least someone else fill the spot of “cruise director”.

Lastly, let’s talk sibling rivalry, that is Thai X-ing vs Beau Thai. I like Beau Thai’s Pad Thai better than Thai Xing’s Pad Thai. However, I like Thai X-ing’s Panang a tad bit better than Beau Thai’s, mainly because there are some odd veggies thown in (last time I had the Panang Tofu) the Thai X-ing version. Beau Thai’s Panang is good, the sauce is good and thick and hangs on to the rice. As a left over for lunch I liked it even more.

A quick mention on the passing of Ted McGinn’s wife

Ted, for those of you who didn’t know is the big white man at the Bloomingdale Farmer’s Market and is quite involved with the community north of Florida Ave. He hasn’t been as of late because of his wife’s battle with cancer. Last week the battle was lost. There will be a memorial service Thursday July 29th at the Friends Meeting House, followed by a pot-luck at the Big Bear. I saw something on the Eckington listserv from Holly Baynham organizing the pot-luck. There is more information on the Bloomingdale Blog about this.

This page contains a single entry by Mari published on July 21, 2010 8:00 AM.

Boundary Stone Tavern/Pub


Hidden tin ceiling
Originally uploaded by In Shaw

Well Scott Roberts has a much better description of the proposed pub for Bloomingdale because the man knows what questions to ask. All I asked about was noise, because the rear of the location backs up to several residential bedrooms. I was told that they expect to keep the noise on Rhode Island Ave., not a quiet street mind you.
You can ask what the heck is this photo I have attached here. Well, it is the cool looking tin ceiling that is hidden behind the dropped ceiling at 116 Rhode Island Avenue NW/Boundary Stone. What the owners would like to do (provided they get approved for the liquor license) is put in a mezzanine as there is about 10-11 extra feet in some spots. The building housing this proposed pub is in the former Sylvan Theater and the landlord for this building seems to be amenable to improving and adding value to his property (as opposed to some other commercial landowners who are crazy).
The pub owners are hopeful about when they may be able to make this come to life. But before any of that there is the ABC liquor dance between the ANC, the neighbors and the owners. The ANC will (regardless of support) protest the license, the owners will agree to a voluntary agreement, someone will go on and on about how there will be drunkards in the streets and that we don’t need more liquor in our neighborhood.
PoP also has a post on this too.

Big Bear Beer II

Sometime after all the youth/school related stuff at the BACA meeting, about an hour into it, we finally got to Big Bear and their general ideas of pursuing an ABC liquor license. There were two persons from Bog Bear, one being Matt Sellers, the other guy a blond barista… now if it is a guy do you call them baristas? Not baristos?
Anyway. Big Bear is aiming for a CR license. For those of you unfamiliar with the wonderful world of ABC licenses, a class C Restaurant license is one for places where at least 45% of revenues come from food sales. It is different from the class of licenses for bars or corner markets. The was one objection mentioned, coming from a Baptist minister, presenting his concerns about people getting drunk and hanging out in the park. This was countered by the Episcopalian church secretary reminding him of Jesus’ first miracle at the wedding at Cana, turning water into wine.
There were questions about Big Bear expanding and the space they have. The bear is kind of landlocked and the space above is leased to tenants, so in the near future, nope. Maybe, years down the road. Another question was the issue of vagrants/ neighbor characters. Characters do drop by to get a glass of water and to use the bathroom and for the most part they don’t cause a problem.
The idea is Big Bear has a vibe as a cafe, hang out and they have no intention of becoming a bar, they just want to expand their food service options. I asked the barista (m) if the idea is to offer something like Teaism, and he answered in the affirmative. As far as I can tell despite having a small park area and a restaurant/bar across the street, the Penn Quarter Teaism fails to produce drunkards rolling out of its doors.

A few things revisited

a grocery store in ne
On the Eckington listserv there is all this back and forth about the old Safeway and hoped for replacement. Please take the Harris Teeter off the list. According to an old press release HT is scheduled to open Winter 2010/2011. According to a recent DCMUD post (hat tip eckington blog), that date could be November 2010.
Honestly Eckington/Edgewood area, I don’t see what that area has to attract the kind of store y’all think you deserve. The two favorites according to Debbie Smith’s poll were Trader Joe’s (which tends to like small spaces with hidden parking) and Wegmans. What no Balducci’s? I left the Logan Circle are a few months after the Whole Foods opened, and from what I remember the civic authorities of that area showed how the population of Logan/Shaw (and Dupont) could support a Whole Foods. The Soviet Safeway, the O Street Giant, and the no-name grocery in the area were no competition for the kind of shopper that would support WF. If y’all can prove that a national or regional grocery chain can thrive there despite a Giant nearby that happens to be very convenient to a metro station with many buses, go for it.

and regarding sidewalks and the problems for those in wheelchairs (from Scott Roberts list)

See this 2/17/2010 message from ANC 5C04 Commissioner John Salatti:

Bloomingdale does it again: another resident is helped!

Once again, Bloomingdale residents have shown their concern for their neighbors and done it with more than just words. This past weekend I heard from Angela xxxxxxx who uses a motorized wheelchair to get to and from college in Rockville, MD. She makes that daily trip using Metro. That trip is long and difficult on the best of days (Angela has some hairy stories of having to drive her wheelchair down Michigan Avenue from the Brookland Metro Station when the buses have not run), her trip became impossible after the snow storm because she could travel barely 20 feet from her property before the sidewalk became impassable for her wheelchair.

After meeting with Angela and hearing her situation and what she needs to go back to school, I called on a number of residents for a major operation: get Angela from her home in the xxxx block of Flagler Place to the bus stop at North Capitol and W Street, about a third of mile. And once again Bloomingdale responded. Many, many thanks to Sara Kaufman and Mike McNeil of the Unit block of W Street, and Dodd Naiser, Alastair Pakiam, and Brandon Skall of Flagler Place for joining me to widen the path on the sidewalk and for chopping out a lot of ice so that Angela could make her way safely to the bus stop and back. We went with her on a test drive back and forth. She couldn’t believe that people would do so much to help her.

Thanks everyone!

Please clear the sidewalks.

Timor, Timor, How We Love Timor


There is an article (PDF) out on the greatness that is Timor Bodega. Don’t let the closed gate fool you, he’s open. The article mentions Timor owner Kim Wee’s winter veggie box program and the Union Street soaps. Last I looked he was out of Black Tea and Sage which is an awesome soap. The tea embedded in the soap give you some scrubby action in the shower, and bonus is you get to rub yourself with caffine in the morning. I also have the oatmeal, which is more nubbly than scrubby, not as great as the black tea. There is a Cinnamon Orange bar that smells wonderful and keeps my bathroom smelling great hours after I’ve showered.
The yogurt is the best. I’ve been spoiled by the yogurt there, as I got some yogurt at Giant and found it watery in comparision.
When my cousin returns to eat me out of house and home, she will get the sourdough bread hiding in one of Kim’s freezers. She raves about it. Sometimes she won’t wait till the loaf is completely defrosted that she starts picking at it and eating it. It makes for a good ingredient for my french toast, too.
Timor is very unique not because of what it has (or doesn’t have, which at times can be frustrating) but because of the atmosphere created. Remember back two years ago when Kim opened Timor, he had the dairy case and just one low aisle of shelf stable items. Now as he’s past his second year anniversary with us, he seems to have found some sort of system, balance, method (whatever) that works, and the shelves are taller and there is more stuff, but you still have to ask him if he has X, because it might be in season and it is in the back, in a hidden freezer, or something. In that back and forth in figuring out what works, and what doesn’t something wonderful was created. And in that two years we have pointed to Timor as a neighborhood asset. Yes, it’s in Bloomingdale, but close enough to the border to be enjoyed by Shaw people.

News from other blogs or Friday Misc.

Over in Bloomingdale The Yoga District is having a mommy & me, but with a more inclusive title of Family Yoga and Community Playtime.

The Great Scott Roberts also mentioned some tasty info he got from a Bloomingdale restaurant hopefully to come at NJ & R. According to WashBiz Journal, Beau Thai, a carry out, is due to open in March, hopefully, maybe, fingers crossed.
Speaking of restaurants on R, anyone know what’s going on with 6th and R for the proposed Toque Cafe? I’ve noticed a change of windows and the application of paper over the windows, so I hope there is something good going on behind the paper.

Over here in the TC, the BACA blog tells that there will be a grand opening of the Eckstine and Ellington Theatre at the Dorothy I Height Community Academy Public Charter Schools (CAPCS)school, also known as Armstrong, this weekend.
have a great weekend y’all.

Quirky Business

I went to Thai X-ing, and it has been a while for me as I’ve been making more of my own meals and cooking up ingredients from the Bloomingdale Farmers Market. Since opening back in 2005 getting your food isn’t measured in hours any more. Taw has gotten help, made some changes, and if I order early enough, I get my food around the estimated time. In time some of us have learned to tolerate/love Thai X-ing’s quirks. With those quirks, others, have managed to work with Taw’s flexible, if not super easygoing nature, to transform the little hole in the wall eatery. It isn’t like your average Thai restaurant or carryout. I’ve been in it at times when the best description is ‘your friend’s friend’s basement apartment living room that happens to have a guy cooking Thai food in the back.’
Timor Bodega is another quirky business, and it’s been open for about a year and a half and is still figuring itself out. It’s not like your usual quickie mart, in that it lacks cigarettes, Lotto, and 5 kinds of MD 20/20, the big money makers. Nor is it a chi-chi wine and cheese shop, mainly because of the minimal amount of cheese, which may or may not change. I hung out with the owner this past weekend and learned a bit about the Timor and its quirks. Kim, the owner, does some small scale coffee roasting for customers, but doesn’t heavily promote this service. The store does experiment with various new products, like the duck eggs (good for when you’re aiming for thickness). I guess I can’t avoid mentioning the least popular quirk, the post-robbery closed gate during business hours thing. Kim’s reasoning on doing this has less to do with the crime (where they only got $50, and sadly there was another sort-of attempt by some 15 yr olds) and more to do with business being slow on beautiful days. Besides he’s usually 15-20 seconds away. But there are things about Timor that make it a neighborhood jewel. For me it is and always has been the milk and the rich cream. It is also the local eggs, the granola, and the wines, of which Kim can talk about, if you ask him. It will be interesting to see what Timor will look like in a year and what it will be carrying. Maybe more cheese and cured meats?

Crap Today Must Be Truxton Circle Day

Prince of Petworth has “Reader Finds Remnants of Truxton Circle.”

and though posted yesterday, but the comments are from today…
BACA Blog asks What’s in a Name? particularly the name Truxton Circle.

And during my lunch hour I created this bibliography thing about the TC and the WP. Click comment to see it all.
History of the term “Truxton Circle” in the Washington Post
[Method search “Truxton Circle” in ProQuest looking for articles only prior to 01/01/1940 in the Washington Post, which includes the Washington Star. Not all articles are cited.]

THE DISTRICT SURVEYOR.; Recommendations About the Preservation of Plats and Records. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Aug 1, 1891. p. 5 (1 page)- regarding surveys for proposed circles. This is the earliest mention of the TC found.

ASKS DISTRICT TO PAY; Dog Catchers Caused Injury to a Bicycle. CHASED BULLDOG, BROKE A WHEEL Animal in Attempting to Escape the Net Ran Into the Bicycle of P.J. Nee, Who Claims Damages — District Auditor Approved Application and Recommends Payment — Plants from Mount Vernon Square to Decorate Other Reservations. The Washington Post. Mar 15, 1900. p. 12 (1 page) – Shrubbery for the circle. No mention of the Knights who say shrubbery.

AFFAIRS OF ECKINGTON.; Mr. Macfarland Opposed to Citizens’ Associations’ Candidate for School Board. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Jun 26, 1900. p. 2 (1 page)- Mentions moving a fountain at Pennsylvania, M and 26th to “Truxton Circle in Eckington.” Citizens associations tended to be white, and the Eckington Citizen Association I’ve noticed stuck their noses in the affairs of things south of Florida Avenue to about New York Avenue. Prior to 1900 the TC wasn’t heavily populated, in 1880 there were less than 1,000 persons living in the area.

MR. MACFARLAND THEIR GUEST.; Commends Interest of Citizens’ Association in Public Affairs. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: May 28, 1901. p. 8 (1 page)- Mentions the Eckington and North Capitol Citizen Associations, and them thanking the city for the fountain at Truxton Circle.

SALE OF SIX HOMES SHOW PRICES HIGH The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Apr 27, 1919. p. R6 (1 page)- 51 Q Street NE (modern Eckington) being described as near Truxton Circle. In same article Dupont Circle is described as a neighborhood. TC not described as such.

$110,500 IN SALES OF HOMES IN CITY; Houses Fetch $17,500 Disposed by Hartung & Gibbons. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Nov 7, 1920. p. 34 (1 page). 149 Bates Street sold and described as being near North Capitol and Truxton Circle. In same article, Bloomingdale described as ‘an attractive area’.

RYAN QUITS CENTRAL CITIZENS’ PRESIDENCY; Will Head Movement to Form Another Association in Same Territory. SECTION CALLED TOO BIG The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Apr 26, 1925. p. 2 (1 page)- Mr. Francis J. Ryan proposes a new citizens association that would have borders from NY Ave, Truxton Circle, and New Jersey Avenue……

AUTO SIGNAL LIGHTS TO BE READY DEC. 15; Sixteenth Street Crossings and Truxton Circle to Be Equipped. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Nov 14, 1925. p. 20 (1 page)- Truxton Circle gets a traffic light.

Girl Drives with Arm Around Poodle; Fined. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Jul 9, 1926. p. 22 (1 page)- In sub article, people are skinny-dipping in the Truxton Circle fountain.

$15,000 Asked in Suit For Alleged Injury. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Aug 13, 1926. p. 20 (1 page)- Woman Sues streetcar company because of injury in a car at the TC.

NOTES OF DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL; News of Departments
The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Jun 19, 1927. p. S10 (2 pages)- Mention of Truxton Circle Station Post Office. The post office will out live the circle.

400 CARRIERS NAMED FOR CHRISTMAS MAIL; Postmaster to Appoint Equal Number of Clerks for the Holiday Rush. BARGAIN DAYS ANNOUNCED
The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Dec 11, 1927. p. 2 (1 page)- Post office. Other post offices mentioned are U Street and Petworth.

$25,000 Asked for Injuries. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Jul 11, 1928. p. 8 (1 page)- Did they have a phone and if so, did they have a lawyer? Lawsuit regarding traffic accident at Truxton Circle.

Washington’s Fountains Temper Summer’s Heat; Increased Supply of Water Due to the New Filtration Plant on Conduit Road Enables the City to Keep Fountains Going More Regularly Than in the Past — Boon to Children and Other Stay-at-Homes. Washington’s Fountains Temper Summer Heat, by Victoria Faber Stevenson.. The Washington Post (1877. Jul 29, 1928. p. SM3 (2 pages)- Mentions how the Truxton fountain in Truxton Circle was becoming a landmark.

MAN DIES TWO HURT IN MOTOR MISHAPS; Driver of Truck Is Instantly Killed When Crushed Against Radiator. LAD PAINFULLY INJURED. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Dec 17, 1929. p. 5 (1 page)- First noted traffic death at the circle. The problem was truck was overloaded with granite and crushed driver.

Bandit Pair Robs 2 Filling Stations; First and H and Wisconsin and Q Gasoline Depots Are Victimized. The Washington Post (1877-1954). Washington, D.C.: Dec 27, 1932. p. 14 (1 page)- First noted robbery of Truxton Circle post office at 17 Florida Ave NE.

[article search 1940-1999]
Post Office Bandits Get $500 Here, The Washington Post, Times Herald (1959-1973). Washington, D.C.: Jul 24, 1965. p. A3 (1 page)- Last mention of Truxton Circle post office getting robbed.

Subsidy Program’s Nuts and Bolts, The Washington Post (1974-Current file). Washington, D.C.: Aug 2, 1984. p. A15 (1 page)- Truxton Circle first mentioned as a neighborhood as a target area for mortgage subsidies.

D.C. Cable Firm Unveils Wiring Schedule, Seeks More Concessions; D.C. Cable Firm Tells 5-Year Plan, Seeks Concessions , by Marcia Slacum Greene Washington Post Staff Writer. The Washington Post (1974-Current file). Washington, D.C.: Sep 4, 1985. p. C1 (2 pages)- Another article mention of Truxton Circle in listing of neighborhoods to get cable.

Community Outcry Wins Reprieve for Lenny’s; Bank Delays Evicting Popular Neighborhood Store Until Buyer for Building Is Found by Elizabeth Wiener Special to The Washington Post. The Washington Post (1974-Current file). Oct 31, 1991. p. DC2 (1 page)- Quote” I understand the position Riggs [National Bank] is in – they just want to download the property, and they’re within their rights, “ said Kathy Glynn, chairman of the Truxton Circle Coalition, an umbrella group for civic associations in the area. “But we’re really getting tired of the constant destabilization of businesses moving out because of crime and real estate turnovers. This is a store people rely on.”

BFM on NPR’s Morning Edition

This morning I awoke to the sound of thunder and went back to sleep. Then the clock radio clicked on, and I tried fighting not going back to sleep, and then a story caught my groggy attention. Listen to local resident and NPR reporter, Neda Ulaby’s report about our dear Bloomingdale Farmer’s Market. You’ll hear the voices of other locals Ted Mcginn, Robin Schuster, and Scott Roberts.
It is amazing how the area (though not in the TC I’m claiming it) got this wonderful market. It’s got kids and dogs and so far so good with that. I’ve said it before the market has a great atmosphere, that I haven’t experienced at some of the other DC markets. Dupont has a lot of great stuff, but OMG is it crowded. I ran into one in Georgetown it was rinky-dink, but then again it was closing down when I showed up. and the farmer’s market (this was a while ago so it may have changed) near the Department of Ag, felt lacking. And Penn Quarter’s farmers market, where I’m heading to after work, is good, but not the same.
I’m still loving the strawberries that are in season. I still have some waiting for turning into a strawberry spread, loosely based on Copper Pot‘s recipe seen on Fox 5. I halved all the ingredients, including the time but except the vanilla, and use the spread to make strawberry ice cream. The jellies Stefano Frigerio (Mr. Copper Pot) sells is firmer, more jell-y. Didn’t see him last week at BFM, so I’ll be keeping an eye out for him this weekend as his pasta sauces are wonderful.