Rose’s at Home/ Rose’s Luxury/P&P – A Delivery Food Review pt 1

So all the restaurants are closed because of the global pandemic. The silver lining of this cloud of death is that some of the Michelin starred and Bib Gourmand are offering delivery or take out. Since we’ve become parents, are ability to enjoy the fine dining options in the city have been limited, so this allows us to “revisit” some places in our own home. Last time it was Bib Gourmand Red Hen. This time it’s the one starred Rose’s Luxury (sister to the 2 starred Pineapples & Pearls) with their Rose’s at Home service.
What's in the box
So we got the 3 night meal, because that was the only thing left, and paid a total of $288. It was to be delivered sometime around 3 something on Monday. We got a call from the driver a bit before 3pm (Google map problem I’m noticing with Uber and other things) trying to find us. Then we got this big box of food! And instructions, there were instructions.

Meal No. 1 Plated
Night One Menu
Green Tomato Panzanella, sourdough & anchovy
Pickle-brined Fried Chicken and honey & benne seeds
Cinnamon Sugar Monkey Bread (not pictured)

The instructions were to leave it out for an hour to get it to room temperature. It worked fine. The chicken wasn’t crispy, but it wasn’t soggy. A fair amount of the crust separated from the chicken meat, which was fine with me. The meal came with some hot sauce that had a burn but was warming, not flaming. It was so good, I was wondering if I could make a Bloody Mary with it.

We have a 2.5 year old and he got dinosaur chicken (nor Rose’s) so he could eat with us. We shared a bit of our dinner with him. He liked the fried chicken, as he said it tasted like candy. That was the honey. He did not care for the pickled green tomato, but he stole all of my soft sourdough croutons. Destructo-kid and my spouse shared the monkeybread. I’m sorta on a diet so I let them have mine. About halfway through the dessert, we decided to just pop it in the microwave for a few seconds. That was good too.

The best thing was the time saved. We were able to eat with our son, put away the dishes, put him to bed and amazingly have time to watch a movie. Thanks Rose’s at Home!

I’ll review our second meal later.

Red Hen- A take out food review

So we wanted to help an area restaurant because the global pandemic has hit DC and all the restaurants have pretty much shut down in some way. Many have reopened but with a limited or different menu. I love food and I love fancy pants dining, but I have a 2 year old which means a sitter, so we pass. But as I mentioned in my last post, this disaster has presented an opportunity to dine from some very fine restaurants with the 2 year old.

Tonight, we tried out Bloomingdale’s Red Hen. In 2017 and 2020 it was named as a Bib Gourmand restaurant in the Michelin guide.

Looking at this I’m admitting I tipped poorly, but I was aiming for a round number. I sent the spouse out to get the food and he came back with some switchels I did not order, I should have tipped more. (See note below).

Anyway, Red Hen’s regular menu and their take out menu are pretty close. I found their drink menu, entertaining. The house cocktails were either a kit or a batch. Their bottles of wine range from $45 to $145. Not sure what the $20 corkage is.

I had the Italian Chicory Salad and the Roasted Spaghetti Squash. My spouse had the Chicken Liver toast and the Radiatori. Our 2 year old had bits of our meals. The food came in paper take out containers. I do realize a lot of what makes some fancy schmancy places special is presentation and well, it’s the end times, whaddya want? They looked very nice in their packages.  At first, the 2 year old loudly refused samples of what we were having. But as soon as he saw us eating, he wanted some. He took about 1/2 of my spaghetti squash dish, and ate most of it. He had a few bites of Daddy’s toast…. nope, he did not want any butter or chicken liver. It was the fancy hard bread. He had a few slices of Wonderbread level soft bread from the Inshaw kitchen. He also had Daddy’s pasta, but by the time he got around to getting a second bite, Daddy was done eating.

I have no star rating. It was good. We enjoyed it. It probably would have been better if my spouse left the house earlier to pick it up ad if we ate immediately after he got home with the food but the 2 year old delayed things. So some of the cheese had solidified in the pasta dish, but not to the point it was less than tasty. It was quite tasty. It is better when it comes fresh from the chef’s kitchen. So my advice is walk faster and eat sooner.
Post Red Hen Take Out

NOTE (edited 3/23/2020): I noticed the charge on our account for this was higher than $70. My beloved spouse gave an extra $30 tip. So now I don’t feel bad about the tip anymore.

Support Local Restaurants or an opportunity to eat well at home

Note- This was typed up 3/17/2020 at 3pm. Everything subject to change with the rules of how governments and businesses respond to COVID-19.

So we are to hunker down in the house, but every so often you need to get out. Why not support some local TC businesses and still enjoy the goodness that is them?

ANXO at 3rd & Florida NW in Truxton Circle will be selling ciders and wines to-go. Their Instagram page has more info. Also you can support them by buying gift cards, so you can enjoy them when things are back to normal.

Republic Cantina on the other end of the TC on N St. NW is also doing take out. They are offering their cafe and dinner menu items for take out.

Am I missing any other Truxton Circle biz in the TC?

Over in Bloomingdale:

So Red Hen, you know Michelin mentioned them… finally you can get take out at this usually fine dine in restaurant. I’m licking my lips looking at their dinner menu. They are also selling gift cards for when happier days come around.

Tiber Creek, not mentioned by a fab French tire company, via their Instagram (I am not signed up for the instas, I’m old and I’m annoyed I have to go to Instagram to find things out because info is not on your main web page or Twitter) will be doing take-out.

Bacio Pizza– Take out only (stupid Instagram info).

Michelin level restaurants make you food-

Seeing the opportunity that Red Hen presented, a normally sit down restaurant I can’t go to because I’d need a sitter because the 2 year old has terrible table manners, is now offering take out food. So that got me wondering what other places of that high caliber, that require a sitter, are providing provisions? So I took a look at the Michelin Guide for DC and saw these. If it ain’t mentioned, they either are closed or haven’t mentioned anything.

Kinship– at 1015 7th St NW, the website says tomorrow (3/18/2020) they will be doing to go service. So watch that space.

The Dabney– They have take out, 3 courses for $45. From their site “Orders will be taken by phone from 11am – 2pm daily by phone only for that evening’s menu; there are limited number of dinners available. We are unable to modify the set menu, and payment will be processed upon order. In addition, a concise selection of wines by the bottle are available for purchase. ”

I have no idea what Jose Andres is doing in his awesomeness, but I doubt the community kitchen offerings at minibar is going to be as amazeballs as normal minibar.

Masseria– They will bring food to you. You just have to order before 3pm, delivery between 4-6pm.

Gravitas– They plan to offer pickup and delivery options.

Rose’s Luxury– They already have the Rose’s at Home service, which is currently offering drop off and Pick Up service. And there is the take away menu. The Pineapples and Pearls site will point you to this service.

Maydan– They have to go but I have no idea what is available.(instagram info)

Komi and Little Serow–  Get carry out at Little Serow and Komi plans to implement Happy Gyro later this week.

Little Pearl– See Rose’s Luxury and their evening takeout menu.

Sushi Taro– (g*d**m Instagram). Pick up menu from 12-8pm, $30. See the stupid instagram page for options.

 

 

 

Black Businesses of 1968 Shaw: Personality Studio and Gift Shop

Another item from the “pile”, this is another post 1968 riot for a Shaw business. Carl R. Webb owned Personality Studio and Gift Shop at 1618 7th Street NW, Washington, DC, in Shaw. Currently that same location is for some medical supply store.
The store experienced extensive glass damage and theft. It appears the owner Mr. Webb, an African American man, decided to remain after the riot but was planning on changing his shop into a Ben Franklin store, a kind of five and dime.

1618 7thSt NW by Mm Inshaw on Scribd

Random Asian owned business in 1968 Shaw

Pulling another document from the “pile”.

This is a post 1968 riot survey filed by Shaw Foo Chin, owner of Bill’s Laundry and Dry Cleaning at 1718 14th Street NW. I have no clue who Bill is. Currently there is a Peregrine Espresso coffee shop there.

Mr. Chin seemed to be okay. Rioters smashed his sign and stole his customers’ dry cleaning. Mr. Chin reported that he conducted his own repairs.

1718 14th ST NW by Mm Inshaw on Scribd

Black Businesses of 1968 Shaw: Delaney’s Pool Room

Okay the only reason why I know this was a black owned business is because of the survey the government conducted right after the April 1968 riots. They asked business and property owners in the riot corridors about their race and those who bothered responding, self reported their race. Or not.

Anyway, John Delaney owned a pool room at 1720 7th Street NW, where a post riot building currently sits. He did not suffer any fire damage. Instead he got a lot of broken glass and some things were stolen. It is unknown if he put “Soul Brother” on his shop to keep it from getting torched.

Delaney’s Pool Room Post Riot Survey by Mm Inshaw on Scribd

I don’t know if I’ll make this a series, like the 1957 Church Surveys, but who knows. My reason for posting this is to show that history is messy. The present is messy. There is no clean narrative where you can say, there were no black businesses in the Shaw ghetto. There were. There were plenty of black owned businesses, and some of them got hit by rioters. Some closed shop, and some, like Delaney thought Shaw was a perfectly fine neighborhood to do business.

Twelve Years Later…. at Big Bear

Big Bear Cafe April 27, 2007

Today, because it’s Friday and because we came up with lame excuses not to go to work, the Help and I are having a day date. We decided to start it off by having breakfast at Big Bear. It was great. I had french toast and a pot of English Breakfast tea as we sat inside with the Washington Post and the ambiance of the place.

I observed a family, where the father saw two separate friends/ acquaintances. He chatted with one, who came over and joked with the man’s elementary aged kids who were out of school for a thing.

Outside there were people. Some sat alone, tapping away at their laptops. Others gathered with a friend or two. And there were two workers fixing the paving thingamabobs.

About twelve years ago I stood in almost the exact space I was sitting at with my spouse. Big Bear in April 2007 was a possibility. I have a couple of pictures from an open house they held back then. The owners invited neighbors in to take a look at the place and nosh. Then, it was just going to be a coffee shop.

While I sat, I was comparing the feel of the place, then and now. Now it has a rhythm and a rep. It has a certain neighborhood vibe. I noticed parents, besides the one I mentioned earlier, with their kids on the way to school, pop in for a coffee. It just felt comfortable. It wasn’t full of promise or possible failure. It was, what it was.

The physical building and space has also changed. The patio is like part of the building, where people can sit (and battle bugs) under a canopy of grape vines behind walls of plants. The walls have art and shelves of booze (they make a good Old Fashioned) that weren’t there before. Oh, and there is a very tiny functional kitchen. The kitchen was very tiny in 2007, but not as functional.

2020 Michelin Guide Bib Gourmands in Shaw

Laotian spaghetti and meat-sauce
Hanumanh

Michelin has their guide out on-line and there are a few Shaw and Shaw adjacent places on the list.

Chercher1334 9th St NW. There are two locations. I’m assuming they are talking about the one in Shaw.

Hanumanh– Normally at 1604 7th St NW but they are undergoing some “unexpected” repairs. So they are on 14th St for now.

Pearl Dive Oyster Palace1612 14th St NW.

Red Hen1822 1st St NW. Not in Shaw but in walking distance from our house, so Shaw adjacent as far as I’m concerned.

Royal501 Florida Ave NW. Another Shaw adjacent place but is actually Shaw adjacent. You can sit out side and look longingly across Florida Ave and see Shaw.

Supra. Georgian food y’all. You can argue that it’s in Mt. Vernon.

Tiger Fork922 Blagden Alley, NW. We keep meaning to go here.

Unconventional_Diner_dish

Unconventional Diner- 1207 9th St NW. Once again we can argue about where this is, Mt. Vernon/Shaw. I’m going to link to their OpenTable page because their website has been hijacked.

Forget Go-Go Bring Back the Jazz to Shaw

Duke Ellington and unknown woman @ Howard Theater(?)

So there was that story about the Go-Go music being blasted at 7th and Florida. And more stories about Go-Go and the changing neighborhood, as if neighborhoods don’t change. Neighborhoods, cities, cultures change. There used to be jazz in Shaw. Good jazz, as in the kind you can dance to. But that kind of jazz is not something you’ll find listed at the Howard Theater, the only reason to go to the Dunbar Theater is to bank with Wells Fargo, and Bohemian Caverns is dark.

The jazz I like is gone and it probably won’t come back to Shaw.

I can’t blame gentrification. I can’t even blame the riots. What is to blame is what comes to all forms of popular and even niche genres, tastes and audiences change. What has befallen the jazz I like (I’m ignoring that other stuff that calls itself jazz) could easily fall upon Go-Go. The audience that grew up with it gets older, younger audiences are more into something else. The artists change, they may want to pursue or try new things. The market changes, as people stop buying CDs and CD players and Spotify/Pandora-rify their music. Also, I’ve been told Go-Go is best experienced live. For me, the artists changed and started creating undancable, unsingable jazz that decoupled itself from popular music, and younger audiences were getting into Rock-n-Roll.

So, for now, there is a phone store that sells Go-Go CDs on the side and blasts Go-Go music outside. Considering record stores do more closing than opening, I’m going to guess the money is in being a phone store. It’s unreasonable to expect the neighborhood to support one genre of music. If the neighborhood’s history of musical support is anything to go by, the best one can hope for is having a few buildings, maybe a street named after artists, and half-aszed attempts by city bureaucrats at music appreciation. Businesses are going to do what they need to do to stay in business. Customers are going to buy what they want to buy, in the format they want to purchase. And all of that will bring the end of Go-Go, not a neighbor who wants the music turned down.