Truxton Circle Property Owners, 1933

Okay the pages for Squares 507 to 510 East are crap. But the pages for Squares 519-521, 550-555, 614-618 and 668-670 (the NE Truxton) are readable.

What is it?

The National Archives has images of some of their stuff in their catalog. So I pulled out parts that pertained to Truxton Circle, here (for a better image of sq. 507-510E), and here. This is just more evidence for the history of Truxton Circle. If I (or someone else, hint, hint) decide to cross reference this list of property owners with a city directory or the 1930 Census, we could see who were landlords and who were homeowners. All sorts of questions could crop up from the data.

Anyway, here’s the pdf.

Truxton Circle 1933 Property Owners by Mm Inshaw on Scribd


 

Mari’s Top Math Schools for White Boys

So I wrote I’d post this later.

This comes out of my interest in looking at scores for African American boys based on what I read in the Diverse Schools Dilemma. The author’s main point was for middle and upper middle class white parents, instead of looking at a school’s test scores overall, look at measurements for white students when they are the minority. The idea was to say that minority-majority schools aren’t necessarily bad for white students. In other words, white families don’t need to move for a good education for their kids.

I decided to switch it up for my son. He’s bi-racial, and there really isn’t any data for bi-racial boys. He’s half white, half black we think (adopted), therefore I looked at data for African American boys. That was my earlier post.

For poops and giggles, I decided to look at the data for white boys, to compare. But limited it to PARCC math scores between 2016 and 2019, because I didn’t feel like doing that much work. I limited it to schools that had 50% or more boys scoring 4+ (met or exceeded expectations). Then I took the top ten for that category (ex. Grade 3). These are my results.

BASIS DC PCS
Brent Elementary School
Capitol Hill Montessori School @ Logan
Deal Middle School
District of Columbia International School
Eaton Elementary School
Hardy Middle School
Hearst Elementary School
Hyde-Addison Elementary School @ Meyer
Inspired Teaching Demonstration PCS
Janney Elementary School
Key Elementary School
Lafayette Elementary School
Ludlow-Taylor Elementary School
Mann Elementary School
Maury Elementary School @ Eliot-Hine
Murch Elementary School
Murch Elementary School @ UDC
Oyster-Adams Bilingual School
Ross Elementary School
School Without Walls @ Francis-Stevens
School Without Walls High School
School-Within-School @ Goding
Shepherd Elementary School
Stoddert Elementary School
Stuart-Hobson Middle School (Capitol Hill Cluster)
Washington Latin PCS – Middle School
Washington Latin PCS – Upper School
Washington Yu Ying PCS
Watkins Elementary School (Capitol Hill Cluster)
Woodrow Wilson High School

There are a few things I noticed. There aren’t many schools where a lot of kids of European decent (I’m just going to write WB- white boys from here out) are failing. Also this does not include schools where WBs are fewer than 10, like Seaton. For both AA boys and WBs, some top schools are top schools with 5 stars because of girl power. I made another table just for African American students (boys and girls) and some schools that were great for African American girls weren’t necessarily great for the boys. If you compare the lists for boys, there are some schools that are good for both, BASIS DC, Shepard Elementary, Deal Middle School, Hyde-Addison Elementary School @ Meyer, Lafayette Elementary School, School Without Walls High School, and Stoddert Elementary School. Lastly, there are a number of DCPS schools on this and the other list. But more DCPS schools on this list than the other.

Why the difference? I don’t know. I have some opinions, but that’s another post that I don’t want to write.

Mari’s Top Schools for African American Males

I’ve been putting most of my education posts on the City Mom’s Blog. There is a post I have planned but it needs data and the format for it doesn’t fit City Moms. So I’m dumping it here.

A book review inspired me to look deep in the test data particularly for African American boys. So looking at schools (pulling from OSSE’s data for 2016-2019) where there were 10 or more Black boys taking the PARCC test, where 50% or more met or exceeded expectations. If there were more than 10 schools that came up I picked the top 10 or 11 if the last two were even.

Top Schools for Black Boys PARCC Math

Barnard Elementary School
BASIS DC PCS
Benjamin Banneker High School
Center City PCS – Brightwood
Center City PCS – Congress Heights
Center City PCS – Trinidad
DC Prep PCS – Benning Elementary School
DC Prep PCS – Benning Middle School
DC Prep PCS – Edgewood Middle School
DC Scholars PCS
Deal Middle School
Eaton Elementary School
Hope Community PCS – Lamond
Hyde-Addison Elementary School @ Meyer
Ketcham Elementary School
KIPP DC – Heights Academy PCS
KIPP DC – KEY Academy PCS
KIPP DC – Lead Academy PCS
KIPP DC – Promise Academy PCS
KIPP DC – Quest Academy PCS
KIPP DC – Spring Academy PCS
KIPP DC – WILL Academy PCS
Lafayette Elementary School
McKinley Technology High School
Payne Elementary School
School Without Walls High School
Sela PCS
Shepherd Elementary School
Stoddert Elementary School
West Education Campus
Whittier Education Campus

Top Schools for Black Boys PARCC ELA

Barnard Elementary School
BASIS DC PCS
Benjamin Banneker High School
Capital City PCS – High School
DC Prep PCS – Benning Middle School
DC Prep PCS – Edgewood Middle School
Deal Middle School
District of Columbia International School
Eaton Elementary School
Elsie Whitlow Stokes Community Freedom PCS
Hope Community PCS – Lamond
Janney Elementary School
Key Elementary School
Lafayette Elementary School
Langdon Elementary School
Ludlow-Taylor Elementary School
Mann Elementary School
McKinley Technology High School
Shepherd Elementary School
Stoddert Elementary School
Two Rivers PCS – 4th St

Just for fun, I’ll post the top schools for White boys in math in DC later.

Same old house, new and improved and expensive

A minor irritation I have with some essays on gentrification and housing is a complete failure to acknowledge investment and disinvestment in physical structures.

This is an August 2004 PropertyQuest picture of 1504 3rd Street NW. I have an earlier one from 2003.150X3rdSt.jpg

Anyway, it sold in August for $765,000. According to the data on Redfin, it sold in 1991 for $76,750. Between 2001-2006 this shell of a house kept getting listed and delisted. I’m not going to do any in-depth research to determine if it changed hands in that period, but in December 2006 it sold for $250,000. Then in 2007 it sold for about $450K, by this time it had definitely been renovated. This year it came back on the market and sold in the mid $700K range.

When someone takes this house and other houses in the neighborhood and just sees prices, what are they thinking? Do they think the rise in price is just arbitrary and an effort to keep lower-income households priced out?

What I witnessed was investment coming into the neighborhood. That house in 2003-2004 was a shell, unfit for human habitation. That was a result of disinvestment when it wasn’t worth it for the owner to maintain the structure.  Shaw had experienced a lot of disinvestment. After the riots in 1968, many businesses didn’t return. Some residents and landlords just abandoned the neighborhood because it wasn’t worth the money to them to fix the damage.

To take a shell from being unfit to being desirable takes capital, investment. Someone paid to buy cabinetry, flooring, windows, paint, drywall, electrical wires, PVC pipes, HVAC system, framing, appliances, and a roof. Plus the labor to install these things. Having renovated my house and another property, I can say this is not cheap. At the very least $100K went into making the house livable.

Well the house was already renovated by 2007, can I justify the $300K-$400K price hike between 2007 and 2019? I can’t tell if the rear deck was already there, but it was the neighborhood that changed in the period that made it more valuable. What happened between 2007 and now? Big Bear, a few blocks away opened up. Then the Bloomingdale Farmers Market about a year later. Nightly gunshots became less of a thing. There are a handful of sit down restaurants within walking distance, 3 that have had or have Michelin mentions. Two with 1 Michelin star within, biking…longer walking distance. Also, other houses in the neighborhood have been renovated and owners have a financial incentive to maintain their properties. But does that justify the price increase? How much is a safer (2019 TC is way safer than 2004 TC) neighborhood worth? How much is it worth to have places to take friends/dates that are a nice stroll back to your place? Schools have improved, and as a parent, it is worth a few thousand to have a plethora of Pre-K choices in walking distance.  As a homeowner, there is a disappointing difference between what you can refinance and what is a possible sales price. The improvements in the neighborhood have allowed us to refinance the house to fix it up, but the value to bank says the house is worth was much, much lower than what was selling around us. But all that is meaningless if all you care about is keeping the price of housing down.